egeiro

musings from the everyday, somedays

Psalm 119 'tav'

The last stanza! After spending nearly 6 months of daily considering a verse from Psalm 119, we’re at the end. This last stanza covers verses 169 to 176 and all begin in the Hebrew with the letter tav. It can also be transliterated as tau or taw. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 169. Let my cry come before you, O LORD; give me understanding according to your word!

Psalm 119 'shin'

Second last stanza. In this post we’re considering the twenty-first stanza - verses 161 to 168 prefixed in the Hebrew with the letter shin. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 161. Princes persecute me without cause, but my heart stands in awe of your words. Persecution comes to all believers in some form or another. In the Psalmist’s case his pursuers wanted to kill him and destroy his reputation and legacy.

Psalm 119 'resh'

Third last stanza. In this post we’re considering the twentieth stanza–verses 153 to 160 prefixed in the Hebrew with the letter resh. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 153. Look on my affliction and deliver me, for I do not forget your law. Further prayers for relief–for ‘deliverance’ which is the Hebrew chalats (H2502). Its root meaning is to pull something off or strip something away.

Psalm 119 'qof'

We’re closing in on the end of the Psalm. These reflections below are on the nineteenth stanza which covers verses 145 to 152. Each verse in the Hebrew begins with the letter qof. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 145. With my whole heart I cry; answer me, O LORD! I will keep your statutes. This verse continues the dominating sub-theme of the Psalm seeking to be obedient in the face of pursuit and persecution.

Psalm 119 'tsade'

We’re up to the eighteenth stanza of Psalm 119–looking at verses 137 to 144 where each line in the Hebrew begins with the letter tsade. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 137. Righteous are you, O LORD, and right are your rules. Here we see the necessary connection or relationship between a righteous God and His laws. If the Lord is wholly righteous, then His decrees (and acts) will also be right.

Psalm 119 'pe'

We’re considering the seventeenth stanza of Psalm 119 - from verses 129 to 136 prefixed with the letter pe. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 129. Your testimonies are wonderful; therefore my soul keeps them. The Psalmist recognises the beneficial character and purpose of God’s word. The word translated as ‘wonderful’ reflects the miraculous and marvellous. The use of the word ‘soul’ is interesting. It is the Hebrew nephesh (H5315) and literally refers to a breathing creature, but can be read as a man, a person, the self or soul.

Psalm 119 'ayin'

We’ve made it as far as the sixteenth stanza of Psalm 119 - from verses 121 to 128 prefixed with the letter ayin. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 121. I have done what is just and right; do not leave me to my oppressors. One of the very few verses in the Psalm that doesn’t make specific reference to God’s word, testimonies, precepts, law, way, etc.

Psalm 119 'samech'

We’ve made it as far as the fifteenth stanza of Psalm 119 - from verses 113 to 120 prefixed with the letter samech. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 113. I hate the double-minded, but I love your law. An interesting comparison/contrast being drawn here. I guess the inference is that if one loves the law of God (and the consequence of seeking to be obedient to it) that double-mindedness is precluded.

Psalm 119 'nun'

We’re looking at the fourteenth of twenty-two stanzas of Psalm 119 - verses 105 to 112 prefixed with the letter nun. These verses, from the ESV®1, interspersed with my comments are: 105. Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path. Perhaps the best known verse from this Psalm? Inspiration and lyric-source for the song Thy Word by Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith. An interesting metaphor that indicates the Lord illuminates both the path we should take and the position of our feet.