bible reading

Psalm 119 'chet'

We’re up to the eighth stanza from Psalm 119 - verses 57 to 6 prefixed with the letter chet. These verses, from the NASB®1, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 57. The LORD is my portion; I have promised to keep Your words. The word translated as ‘portion’ is the Hebrew cheleq (H2506) which refers to an allotment, inheritance or portion. The verse is a declaration of intent. The word translated as ‘promise’ is the Hebrew amar (H559) and can be read as to say or to speak, to call out or declare, to promise.

Psalm 119 'zayin'

We’re up to the seventh stanza from Psalm 119 - verses 49 to 56 prefixed with the letter zayin. These verses, from the NASB®1, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 49. Remember the word to Your servant, In which You have made me hope. An interesting turn-around in this verse where David asks the Lord to remember His word. Is this word the general revelation of God’s will to the Jewish people as David would have received it (the Torah or first five books of the Bible)?

Psalm 119 'vav'

We’re now looking at the sixth of the 22 stanzas of Psalm 119. This covers verses 41 to 48 under the letter vav (also spelt waw). These verses, from the NASB®1, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 41. May Your lovingkindnesses also come to me, O LORD, Your salvation according to Your word; This is the first (and indeed only) verse from the Psalm whose structure per the NASB continues over two verses.

Psalm 119 'he'

This is my fifth post reflecting on stanzas from Psalm 119. This covers verses 33 to 40 under the letter he (also spelt hei). These verses, from the NASB®1, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 33. Teach me, O LORD, the way of Your statutes, And I shall observe it to the end. This verse contains a prayer or request and a declaration. The first clause prayer is answered in many ways and times, but seen explicitly in Scripture in John 14:26 (which I mention in relation to Psalm 119 verse 26) where Jesus speaks about the role of the Spirit.

Psalm 119 'dalet'

This is my fourth post reflecting on stanzas from Psalm 119. This covers verses 25 to 32 under the letter dalet (also spelt daleth). These verses, from the NASB®1, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 25. My soul cleaves to the dust; Revive me according to Your word. ‘My soul cleaves to the dust’ is such an interesting and evocative phrase. A soul (our mind, will and emotions) grovelling and wallowing in the dust.

Psalm 119 'gimel'

My third post looking at a stanza of Psalm 119. This covers verses 17 to 24 under the letter gimel. These verses, from the NASB®1, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 17. Deal bountifully with Your servant, That I may live and keep Your word. The word translated as ‘bounty’ is the Hebrew gamal (H1580) and speaks of bestowing, doing good, rewarding or serving. So ‘deal bountifully’ could equally be ‘do good’, ‘bestow reward’.

Psalm 119 'beth'

This is the second post looking at a stanza of Psalm 119. The first looked at the first eight verses called aleph. This second stanza is called beth (apparently pronounced like ‘bet’). In Hebrew these eight verses all begin with the letter beth. These eight verses, from the NASB®1, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 9. How can a young man keep his way pure? By keeping it according to Your word.

Psalm 119 'aleph'

This is my first post looking at a stanza of Psalm 119 which I’ve spoken about here and here. The first staza of Psalm 119 is entitled ‘aleph’ - being the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet where each verse begins with this Hebrew letter1. The first eight verses, from the NASB®2, interspersed with my comments read as follows: 1. How blessed are those whose way is blameless, Who walk in the law of the LORD.

Psalm 119

This year (all nine days of it) I’ve been taking advice that pastor Philip Henry gave to his son Matthew some 300 years ago. Matthew was the author of the well-regarded commentary he called An Exposition of the Old and New Testaments, but is more commonly known today as Matthew Henry’s Complete Bible Commentary. I wrote about this particular piece of advice mid last year. The advice is to meditate on a new verse from Psalm 119 each day.

Reflections on the prophet Micah 7

We come to the final chapter, and final post on my comments and reflections on the book of the prophet Micah. Micah 7 begins with a brief lament by Micah as he seeks righteous people in Israel but, like a fruit-picker arriving after the harvest, finds little joy (verse 1). Instead he finds people who are violent, seek opportunities to undertake violence, and do it well (2-3). He finds rulers and judges who are corrupt and can be bought with the bribe.

Reflections on the prophet Micah 6

Micah chapter 6 is very much a chapter in two parts. Whilst the chapter and verse divisions in the Bible make it easier to find specific sentences, sometimes the divisions run counter to the narrative and make it more difficult to understand. The chapter divisions in use today were added in the early 13th century, and versification we use was added in the mid-1500s. Micah 6:1-8 The first three verses are a recap of the indictment of the Lord against His people, Israel.

Reflections on the prophet Micah 5

We come to Micah, chapter 5. The early verses (from 2 through 4) speak of the coming Messiah. The words prophecy that one will come from Bethlehem, from the tribe of Judah and will become the ruler of Israel. Interestingly Micah also recognises or speak that this ruler is “from the days of eternity”. Verse 4 is worth quoting in full: And He will arise and shepherd His flock In the strength of the LORD, In the majesty of the name of the LORD His God.

Reflections on the prophet Micah 4

Continuing my thoughts on Micah. Today we’re on chapter 4. The first 5 verses contain a prophecy of what will happen in the last days or latter days. This is a time to come. There is some beautiful imagery in these verses, viz. And it will come about in the last days that the mountain of the house of the LORD will be established as the chief of the mountains.

Reflections on the prophet Micah 3

Further thoughts on the prophet Micah - this time on chapter 3. Micah 3 is a short chapter - 12 verses - and is a chapter in three parts. The first part - verses 1 through 4 details more of what we saw in the previous chapter about injustice, oppression, evil being perpetrated against the people by the elite (the charges are specifically against the “heads of Jacob and rulers of the house of Israel”).

Reflections on the prophet Micah 2

Continuing some thoughts on the book of the prophet Micah. Today looking at chapter 2. The chapter begins with the Lord’s/Micah’s indictment against the people: Woe to those who scheme iniquity, Who work out evil on their beds! When morning comes, they do it, For it is in the power of their hands. They covet fields and then seize them, And houses, and take them away. They rob a man and his house, A man and his inheritance.

Reflections on the prophet Micah 1

In April, May and June I posted some thoughts on what I had been reading in the first 13 chapters of the major prophet, Jeremiah1. Towards the end of May and into early June I read my way through one of the minor prophets, Micah2, reading a chapter (more or less) every day or two. As I read, I journal. This journalling may take the form of observations or comments about the text.

Psalm people

In a book that I’m currently reading, Ancient Paths, the author, Corey Russell quotes Matthew Henry who quotes his father Philip Henry about the benefits of meditating on a different verse from Psalm 119 every day. (Yes, I’m quoting someone who quotes someone who quotes someone who speaks about quoting a Psalm). But let’s go to the source. Here’s what Matthew Henry had to say about his father Philip in Matthew’s work entitled An Account of the Life and Death of Mr.

Early Jeremiah concluded

This the third and final post in a short series looking at some interesting verses from the first thirteen chapters of the prophet Jeremiah. The first part considered aspects of chapters one through six whilst the second part covered chapters seven through twelve. This final part takes a look at chapter thirteen and focuses on one fairly extensive word picture that is painted or drawn in the first eleven verses. The extensive quote is from the New American Standard Bible.

Early Jeremiah continued

Around a month ago I posted some thoughts from the first six chapters of Jeremiah. I’ve now finished reading the first thirteen chapters (out of fifty-two) and have moved on to another book1 for the time being. Like that previous post I’m intending to quote from the New American Standard Bible. For I did not speak to your fathers, or command them in the day that I brought them out of the land of Egypt, concerning burnt offerings and sacrifices.

Early Jeremiah

Earlier this year I began reading in the book of the prophet Jeremiah as a part of my not-quite-daily “quiet time”/“devotional time”/“time with the Lord” 1. I’ve read through Jeremiah several times in the past but not spending time to pause and ponder 2. These days I would read something like 10 or 15 verses - maybe a third to half a chapter at a time and make some notes as I go.

Everything Old

I was looking through some notes I’d made a month-or-two ago whilst reading the book Emotionally Healthy Spirituality by Peter Scazzuro. In it he advocates that believers participate in the Daily Office which are set times of stillness, Bible reading and prayer each day. He suggests the components and indeed the times and frequency can vary and be flexible, but there is value in setting aside multiple parts of the day for spiritual input and reflection.

Lectio Divina

Lectio divina (‘divine reading’) is a Bible reading method that is more than a Bible reading method. It has its origins in 6th century catholicism, but before you switch off, bear in mind that most historical Christian spiritual practices have their antecedents either in biblical times, the early church or catholicism since there were few alternatives until the reformation in the 16th century. It was first practiced by Benedict of Nursia in the 6th century and further developed bu Guigo II, a Carthusian monk in the 12th century.